Fencing

#5
Aside from foilists being argumentative (yes, we are) and epeeists being slow and old, I think my favourite was the use of screaming to persuade the referee that both his judgement and the electric box might be wrong and the loudest scream denotes the winner of the point.

One of the competitions I was at recently was being held after the British Ranking Championships for U18 (a serious business for all involved) for which the Women's Foil final became the most incredible competitive display of mountain lion impersonations!
 
#7
A very interesting insight and thanks for sharing.

I would imagine it is a nightmare to fence an opponent who is orthodox to you. For example if you were right handed and were faced with a left handed fencer?
There's a myth that fencing opposite handers is problematic, but it's just target, distance and opportunity. Put the pointy end on the shiny bit. I think the only modification I make (being right-handed) is to perform circular parries anti-clockwise, close distance and pull that contorted prime, something I don't do against right-handers ... and hug their outside line.

Nah! It's no biggie ...



Prime (Preem)- the guy on the right, hand over head, knuckles pronated, point towards opponent ... and on his outside line.
 
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#9
Thank you for the reply. I understand the point (excuse the pun:D) a little better now.
Not too dissimilar to boxing I assume.

I can remember the first time I watched fencing I could not believe the aggression levels involved. Some of you guys really want to kill each other. :)
Yeah, you know where the attacks are going to come from by the handedness of your opponent and you know how to guard in order for attacks to come where you want them to in order to close them down. You also know that when you do, a simple disengage by your opponent will leave you open, so you're looking to draw the attack for second intention and they'll be making their attacks with second intention in mind ... and so third intention comes into play.

Fencing is most thrilling when a simple attack is executed well and that comes with timing.

In many respects, epee fencing is most akin to boxing. Light footwork, always probing, feinting openings and when that square inch of space opens up, you take it ... anywhere on your opponent: toe, end of finger, wrist, face, wherever and whatever opens up closest to you. Barrel in and you're dead!

 
#10
Yeah, you know where the attacks are going to come from by the handedness of your opponent and you know how to guard in order for attacks to come where you want them to in order to close them down. You also know that when you do, a simple disengage by your opponent will leave you open, so you're looking to draw the attack for second intention and they'll be making their attacks with second intention in mind ... and so third intention comes into play.

Fencing is most thrilling when a simple attack is executed well and that comes with timing.

In many respects, epee fencing is most akin to boxing. Light footwork, always probing, feinting openings and when that square inch of space opens up, you take it ... anywhere on your opponent: toe, end of finger, wrist, face, wherever and whatever opens up closest to you. Barrel in and you're dead!

Fascinating Paul and I like to see a bit of etiquette in any sport. :D
 
#18
Aside from foilists being argumentative (yes, we are) and epeeists being slow and old, I think my favourite was the use of screaming to persuade the referee that both his judgement and the electric box might be wrong and the loudest scream denotes the winner of the point.

One of the competitions I was at recently was being held after the British Ranking Championships for U18 (a serious business for all involved) for which the Women's Foil final became the most incredible competitive display of mountain lion impersonations!
My grandson rowed in high school. My daughter, while waiting for a practice to end, was once talking to another mother who had a son who rowed and one who fenced. This women told my daughter that it was so nice to talk to a rowing parent for, as parents group goe, the fencing parents were the most unpleasant, meddlesome group she ever came across. This was in San Francisco, where youth fencing is taking pretty seriously and where apparently the future of the club's coach can depend on the whims of these capricious parents. In spite of this environment, I understand the San Francisco has produced some world class fencers. Also some pretty good rowers. Interestingly enough, Pacific Rowing Club changed their coach in my grandson's senior year, so it's just not fencing parents who have ideas what their coach should look like.
 
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