Your favourite photographers or images

#1
This thread has been created from a private group conversation that was getting unwieldy - you are invited to share the work of photographers you admire or even single images that have had an impact on you. Anything you like - I'll kick things off -

1-Newton.Sr.jpg

A late picture - you can tell, it's in colour - by Helmut Newton - German/Australian fashion photographer. I think his work is desperately unfashionable these days but I have always admired his pictures. Some regard them as the worst sort of 70's and 80's misogyny but I couldn't disagree more. His models are always the ones in charge in his images. His wife Alice - was his art director throughout his career. Yes - his work is glamorous and - at times erotic - but as the lead photographer for French Vogue, what else would you expect? This is one of my favourite pictures by him. It's gorgeous in every respect. - I.

@Floid_Maniac @Blademonkey @Helveticum @AnthH @Wayne Pritchard @Boru62 @William Dobson
 
#2
My Favourite modern day digital photographer is an American named Scott Kelby.
Scott kelby Image1.jpg

His talent in all fields of photographer is sometimes mind blowing IMO.

I have his boxset containing 4 books that simplistically explain the art of digital photography.
I particularly love the colours he always seems to capture. I wish I had 10% of his talent, I would be a very happy man.

Enjoy! :)
 
#8
Great thread

Ok, this is not by a famous photographer (taken by me), but it's had a very big impact. About 9 months ago I had a serious breakdown. I took the picture about 3 years ago & had it printed onto a canvas. It's a picture of one of the many boardwalks in Alvor.

Whilst trying to come back to the "real world" after my breakdown I would stand and stare at the canvas & remember the great holidays. I don't mind admitting that many a tear has been shed.

I'm now chuckling away as i shall see that view in just over a week. So what might seem like an average image for some, it is a very poignant image for me.

IMG_3778.JPG
 
#9
A fantastic image @shaunwistow and may I congratulate you on being so brave to explain the reason behind it.
There are not many people I know who would be so forthcoming.

I hope this little part of the world wide web has helped you along a little in your recovery.
I am sure your holiday will be amazing too. I must confess I am a little jealous. :)

Have an amazing time and take care my friend.
Wayne :)
 
#10
My Favourite modern day digital photographer is an American named Scott Kelby.
View attachment 27055

His talent in all fields of photographer is sometimes mind blowing IMO.

I have his boxset containing 4 books that simplistically explain the art of digital photography.
I particularly love the colours he always seems to capture. I wish I had 10% of his talent, I would be a very happy man.

Enjoy! :)
Wayne - that is a glorious image. F*** me. Thank you for posting. I.
 
#11
A fantastic image @shaunwistow and may I congratulate you on being so brave to explain the reason behind it.
There are not many people I know who would be so forthcoming.

I hope this little part of the world wide web has helped you along a little in your recovery.
I am sure your holiday will be amazing too. I must confess I am a little jealous. :)

Have an amazing time and take care my friend.
Wayne :)
Thanks Wayne, not a patch on the beautiful pictures you've posted. But I've also got to add that this forum has in a way helped my recovery. I've been suckered into this rabbit hole, but it's helped me focus on what I now class as a passion, oh & the "I must try everything" it occupies my mind in a good way, meaning I'm not thinking of negative things.

I'm a proud Yorkshireman, I tell the truth & wholly admit my faults, I'm the kind of bloke that speaks my mind, what's the point in pussy footing around. Hey if someone doesn't like it then move along is my attitude.

Anyway, enough of my issues, I look forward to more pictures & this thread flourishing.

You are a kind chap.
 
#12
A. - Irving Penn - you can't argue with that. I'd never seen the Dali picture before. Have you ever been in Figueras in Spain? The converted theater where he is buried? He adapted it as a monument to himself - a tribute to one man's ego. Funnily enough his body is under an unmarked slab on what was the middle of the stage. It's quite funny to watch people walking over him not realising. I.
 
#13
Thanks Wayne, not a patch on the beautiful pictures you've posted. But I've also got to add that this forum has in a way helped my recovery. I've been suckered into this rabbit hole, but it's helped me focus on what I now class as a passion, oh & the "I must try everything" it occupies my mind in a good way, meaning I'm not thinking of negative things.

I'm a proud Yorkshireman, I tell the truth & wholly admit my faults, I'm the kind of bloke that speaks my mind, what's the point in pussy footing around. Hey if someone doesn't like it then move along is my attitude.

Anyway, enough of my issues, I look forward to more pictures & this thread flourishing.

You are a kind chap.
@shaunwistow

I'm humbled by your honesty and story, I think - from personal experience - it's a good thing to say these things out loud? It's very much not an average image in any sense. Where is Alvor incidentally? Yours - I.
 
#14
Great thread

Ok, this is not by a famous photographer (taken by me), but it's had a very big impact. About 9 months ago I had a serious breakdown. I took the picture about 3 years ago & had it printed onto a canvas. It's a picture of one of the many boardwalks in Alvor.

Whilst trying to come back to the "real world" after my breakdown I would stand and stare at the canvas & remember the great holidays. I don't mind admitting that many a tear has been shed.

I'm now chuckling away as i shall see that view in just over a week. So what might seem like an average image for some, it is a very poignant image for me.

View attachment 27067
Cracking shot mate, well done. :)
 
#15
@shaunwistow

I'm humbled by your honesty and story, I think - from personal experience - it's a good thing to say these things out loud? It's very much not an average image in any sense. Where is Alvor incidentally? Yours - I.
Thank you, Alvor is in Portugal, Western Algarve. Love the place & without doubt when I get their & sit outside the 1st bar with my wife & daughter a tear will roll down my cheek.... then I need to look for shaving creams :)
 
#16
Great thread

Ok, this is not by a famous photographer (taken by me), but it's had a very big impact. About 9 months ago I had a serious breakdown. I took the picture about 3 years ago & had it printed onto a canvas. It's a picture of one of the many boardwalks in Alvor.

Whilst trying to come back to the "real world" after my breakdown I would stand and stare at the canvas & remember the great holidays. I don't mind admitting that many a tear has been shed.

I'm now chuckling away as i shall see that view in just over a week. So what might seem like an average image for some, it is a very poignant image for me.

View attachment 27067
Thats a wonderful image Shaun. I work, at a tangent, in mental health and I know how important positive imagery can be. You have illustrated that beautifully.
 
#17
As a bleeding heart liberal, I was always attracted to social realism. I know there are always issues around authenticity but this photo by Dorothea Lange haunted me when I was a teenager and reading Steinbeck View attachment 27063
@Barry Giddens

I am a bleeding heart liberal too. Probably the reason I ended up being a photojournalist/news photographer for a living was due to seeing Don McCullin's pictures in the Sunday Times as a child. My parents bought the paper every week. I don't remember the words but the images are seared into my mind. Before Andrew Neil took over as editor and turned it into a leisure supplement. A harbinger of the Thatcher years. Biafra - 1968 - albino child - famine. I.

“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.” - Don McCullin

Biafra-SR.jpg
 
#18
@Barry Giddens

I am a bleeding heart liberal too. Probably the reason I ended up being a photojournalist/news photographer for a living was due to seeing Don McCullin's pictures in the Sunday Times as a child. My parents bought the paper every week. I don't remember the words but the images are seared into my mind. Before Andrew Neil took over as editor and turned it into a leisure supplement. A harbinger of the Thatcher years. Biafra - 1968 - albino child - famine. I.

“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.” - Don McCullin

View attachment 27077
I'm familiar with this image Iain, but I haven't seen it for some time. It's still so powerful. We know what Kurtz would have said.
 
#19
@Barry Giddens

I am a bleeding heart liberal too. Probably the reason I ended up being a photojournalist/news photographer for a living was due to seeing Don McCullin's pictures in the Sunday Times as a child. My parents bought the paper every week. I don't remember the words but the images are seared into my mind. Before Andrew Neil took over as editor and turned it into a leisure supplement. A harbinger of the Thatcher years. Biafra - 1968 - albino child - famine. I.

“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.” - Don McCullin

View attachment 27077
By the way. How on earth can Andrew Neil ever be wheeled out as some sort of 'finger on the pulse' political commentator? There is much to admire about the BBC but.......
 
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