Your favourite photographers or images

Fascinating Ulysses. The comparisons with Salazar's Portugal is very interesting. A Fascism of convenience rather than driven purely by ideology.
@Barry Giddens - 'A Fascism of convenience rather than driven purely by ideology' - a finely made point and well described. I think this speaks of the time and place - an age of ism's. To our modern ideas it lacked 'grey areas,' in popular thought - actually, not popular thought but mainstream constructs. Governmental, state sponsored propaganda - backed up by bayonets - keep your heads down, you'll have a quieter life. @udrako - ' the "Integralists" (Brazilian fascists) were largely nationalists, however pro-allies or pro-neutral and anti-racists,' - anti-racist fascists, an object lesson in nuance. How could you be racist in Brazil? - perhaps excepting the indigenous population - from the off a country based on an astonishingly diverse ethnic base? Mind you it did not stop - historically and indeed currently - mainstream American - and British cultural trends - making the same mistake. I think as long as we address these issues in a historical context we won't be breaking the forum rules. cheers - I.
 
Oh Yes. For example, the Brazilian "fascist" constitution of 1937 was known as "Polish." It was inspired by the Polish constitution and not the Italian, because the Italian was considered fascist :D
Here the cover of the constitution of 1937 of the United States of Brazil.



From 1967, it became the Federative Republic of Brazil.
Massive gaps in my knowledge here Ulysses, and I'm not really sure why. I have a basic understanding of Argentinian, Chilean, and Uruguayan political history, but Brazil has passed me by. It's fortunate that we have you to educate us.
 
@Barry Giddens - 'A Fascism of convenience rather than driven purely by ideology' - a finely made point and well described. I think this speaks of the time and place - an age of ism's. To our modern ideas it lacked 'grey areas,' in popular thought - actually, not popular thought but mainstream constructs. Governmental, state sponsored propaganda - backed up by bayonets - keep your heads down, you'll have a quieter life. @udrako - ' the "Integralists" (Brazilian fascists) were largely nationalists, however pro-allies or pro-neutral and anti-racists,' - anti-racist fascists, an object lesson in nuance. How could you be racist in Brazil? - perhaps excepting the indigenous population - from the off a country based on an astonishingly diverse ethnic base? Mind you it did not stop - historically and indeed currently - mainstream American - and British cultural trends - making the same mistake. I think as long as we address these issues in a historical context we won't be breaking the forum rules. cheers - I.
Beautifully put Iain. And that was a fascinating period. The battle of ideologies. And indeed, the battle within ideologies. One thinks of Orwell's 'Homage to Catalonia'. Some great art came out of that ferment of ideas. I was always drawn to the German Expressionists (nudge for one of your marvellous threads Iain!).
 
It might seem odd for someone that is professionally deeply ingrained in the photo-journalistic/news tradition of photography as am I, but I love high-fashion pictures. I've posted stuff by Helmut Newton before and these are of the same ilk. By Mario Testino - Peruvian born fashion and portrait photographer. I think his pictures enjoy more freedom in creation, editorially than I could ever experience. News photographers work - it might sound counter intuitive- with a huge amount of restraint - both self-imposed and culturally imposed. I'm sure I envy Testino's freedom in making images. Fashion photography creates - an unreal but - a beautiful vision. Nothing is left to chance. Maybe I like them so much because they are the opposite of my photographic world. I hope you like them - I. SR-Mario-1.jpg

SR-Mario-3.jpg

SR-Mario-4.jpg
 
@Barry Giddens - 'A Fascism of convenience rather than driven purely by ideology' - a finely made point and well described. I think this speaks of the time and place - an age of ism's. To our modern ideas it lacked 'grey areas,' in popular thought - actually, not popular thought but mainstream constructs. Governmental, state sponsored propaganda - backed up by bayonets - keep your heads down, you'll have a quieter life. @udrako - ' the "Integralists" (Brazilian fascists) were largely nationalists, however pro-allies or pro-neutral and anti-racists,' - anti-racist fascists, an object lesson in nuance. How could you be racist in Brazil? - perhaps excepting the indigenous population - from the off a country based on an astonishingly diverse ethnic base? Mind you it did not stop - historically and indeed currently - mainstream American - and British cultural trends - making the same mistake. I think as long as we address these issues in a historical context we won't be breaking the forum rules. cheers - I.
Oh, yes:)
I believe we are in a historical and cultural context and I hope I am not breaking the rules of the forum :)
But it's a world of nuances, contradictions and nonsense :)
In the end, the "isms" are just a front for catastrophic social experiments, and mankind ends up paying the final price.
As one of my friends says. "I do not trust ideologies, official books, and doctrines. I trust in whisky. It makes me feel better. Pure, please." :)
 
It might seem odd for someone that is professionally deeply ingrained in the photo-journalistic/news tradition of photography as am I, but I love high-fashion pictures. I've posted stuff by Helmut Newton before and these are of the same ilk. By Mario Testino - Peruvian born fashion and portrait photographer. I think his pictures enjoy more freedom in creation, editorially than I could ever experience. News photographers work - it might sound counter intuitive- with a huge amount of restraint - both self-imposed and culturally imposed. I'm sure I envy Testino's freedom in making images. Fashion photography creates - an unreal but - a beautiful vision. Nothing is left to chance. Maybe I like them so much because they are the opposite of my photographic world. I hope you like them - I. View attachment 27671

View attachment 27672

View attachment 27673
Beautiful images :)
 
SR-OttoDix-1.jpg

'Stormtroops advancing under gas,' - Otto Dix. Etching - 1924. Not a photograph - obviously - but an image none the less. Dix served on the Somme and the Russian front before being seriously injured. When recovered he trained as a pilot. After the war he embraced Modernist art - particularly Dada - considered to be one one of the finest German Expressionists. To the extent that he annoyed the Nazis sufficiently to be branded a 'de-generate artist.' His work was shown and then burnt. They jailed him but he survived and died in 1969. I can't help but see his influence on the work of Ralph Steadman. Like this -

SR-Fear-2.jpg

Cheers - I.
 
View attachment 27703

'Stormtroops advancing under gas,' - Otto Dix. Etching - 1924. Not a photograph - obviously - but an image none the less. Dix served on the Somme and the Russian front before being seriously injured. When recovered he trained as a pilot. After the war he embraced Modernist art - particularly Dada - considered to be one one of the finest German Expressionists. To the extent that he annoyed the Nazis sufficiently to be branded a 'de-generate artist.' His work was shown and then burnt. They jailed him but he survived and died in 1969. I can't help but see his influence on the work of Ralph Steadman. Like this -

View attachment 27704

Cheers - I.
An extraordinary and somewhat eerie explanation behind the images.
Are there any works still remaining that escaped the Nazis burning from Otto Dix?

Thanks for sharing Iain.
 
An extraordinary and somewhat eerie explanation behind the images.
Are there any works still remaining that escaped the Nazis burning from Otto Dix?

Thanks for sharing Iain.
Wayne - yes -

'Dix, like all other practising artists, was forced to join the Nazi government's Reich Chamber of Fine Arts (Reichskammer der bildenden Kuenste), a subdivision of Goebbels' Cultural Ministry (Reichskulturkammer). Membership was mandatory for all artists in the Reich. Dix had to promise to paint only inoffensive landscapes. He still painted an occasional allegorical painting that criticized Nazi ideals. His paintings that were considered "degenerate" were discovered among the 1500+ paintings hidden away by an art dealer and his son in 2012.'

Yours - I.
 
Wayne - yes -

'Dix, like all other practising artists, was forced to join the Nazi government's Reich Chamber of Fine Arts (Reichskammer der bildenden Kuenste), a subdivision of Goebbels' Cultural Ministry (Reichskulturkammer). Membership was mandatory for all artists in the Reich. Dix had to promise to paint only inoffensive landscapes. He still painted an occasional allegorical painting that criticized Nazi ideals. His paintings that were considered "degenerate" were discovered among the 1500+ paintings hidden away by an art dealer and his son in 2012.'

Yours - I.
Many thanks for some fascinating info Iain.
I have much to read (and learn :))
 
View attachment 27703

'Stormtroops advancing under gas,' - Otto Dix. Etching - 1924. Not a photograph - obviously - but an image none the less. Dix served on the Somme and the Russian front before being seriously injured. When recovered he trained as a pilot. After the war he embraced Modernist art - particularly Dada - considered to be one one of the finest German Expressionists. To the extent that he annoyed the Nazis sufficiently to be branded a 'de-generate artist.' His work was shown and then burnt. They jailed him but he survived and died in 1969. I can't help but see his influence on the work of Ralph Steadman. Like this -

View attachment 27704

Cheers - I.
Extraordinary Iain. I see what you mean about Steadman. He also illustrated two of Will Self's 'walking" books.
 
SR -guernica-jpg.jpg

Modernism - let's go for it. Guernica - by Picasso. The most eloquent anti-war statement I have ever seen. Completed in June 1937 - in response to the bombing of the Basque town in April of the same year. Carried out mostly by the German Condor Legion, officially not involved in the Spanish Civil war but generally seen as rehearsing the Blitzkrieg tactics used in the following world war. Picasso - was in exile when he painted this and he stipulated that it could not be resident in Spain as long as Franco was alive. It was returned to Spain in 1981. It currently lives in the Reina Sofia gallery in Madrid. I have spent many hours looking at it. Point one - it's huge - 30 feet wide by 12 feet tall - pretty much. Point two - it's badly damaged - the edges are disintegrating because it has been nailed to so many walls in its life. As I say - it's an astonishing thing. Looking at this representation you can't understand its physical presence. The painting has become a pawn in Spanish politics - Madrid says it is too fragile to move but the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao has a custom designed space to show it. Which I think ought to be its natural home. Following a picture of Guernica - cheers - `i

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